content top

What about Anger? Ephesians 4:25-5:2

Sermon  August 9, 2015 Ephesians 4: 25-5:2  What About Anger? By June Fothergill An elderly lady was well known for her faith and for her boldness in talking about it. She would stand on her front porch and shout “ Praise the Lord”   Next door to her lived an atheist who would get so angry at her proclamations she would shout, “ There ain’t no Lord.” Hard times set in on the elderly lady and she prayed to God to send her some assistance. She stood on her porch and shouted “ Praise the Lord, God I need food. I am having a hard time. Please Lord send me some groceries.” The next morning the lady went out on her porch and noted a large bag of groceries and shouted < “ Praise the Lord.” The neighbor jumped from behind a bush and said, “ Ha, ha. I told you these was no Lord. I bought those groceries. God didn’t” The lady started jumping up and down and clapping her hands and saying, “ Praise the Lord. He not only sent me groceries, but he made the devil pay for them. Praise the Lord.” Can anger lead us to do the right thing?    Aldous Huxley once said, “ You shall know the truth and the truth shall made you mad.”  ( p. 143  1001 Quotes..)    Sometimes anger at injustice or evil can be a motivation for positive action.  Yet, too often anger just leads to trouble and harm In his autobiography Number 1  Billy Martin told about hunting in Texas with Mickey Mantle. Mickey had a friend who would let them hunt on his ranch. When they reached the ranch Mickey told Billy to wait in the car while he checked in with his friend.   Mickey’s friend gave permission for the hunt but also asked Mickey to shoot is old, sick mule for him.  When Mickey  came back to the care he pretended to be angry. He scowled and slammed the door.  I’m somade at that guy, he won’t let us hunt.  I’m going out to his barn and shoot one of his mules.” He ran inside the barn and shot the mule. As he was leaving though he heard two shots. He saw that Martin had taken out his rifle too. “ What are you doing Martin/” He yelled. Martin yelled back, face red with anger, “ We’ll show that son of a gun. I just killed two his cows.” Anger is an emotion all of us feel at some time or other. How do we deal with it in a way that will lead to positive outcomes rather than hurtful ones?   The...

Read More

Sermons based on Ephesians

July 12, 2015 Sermon  “ Restoring the Sacred Circle”  by  Rev. June Fothergill Ephesians 1: 3-14 When I was a young pastor my friend Carol who was Native American invited me to serve on the Native American Council of our conference.  I served for several years.  One of the hard things about that time was the struggle to support the little Native American church at Williamson River, in Klamath country.   I am sad to say, we ultimately were unable to do so in a way that would allow that church to thrive and several years ago the church was closed and the land given to the Klamath tribe.  It was sad for me to lose the only Native American local church in our conference.  I still wonder, did we really take the time to understand their needs and respond appropriately?   When we talk about restoring the sacred circle of relationships with Native American persons and others different from the dominate culture, we face a complex mix of history and present circumstances. The world that first receive the letter we call Ephesians was also complex.  The Roman empire in the time of Paul and those who wrote in his tradition was connecting the peoples of the known world together in ways never seen before.  Paul and his associates could travel freely throughout the Mediterranean. People from all sorts of backgrounds and cultures were able to talk with one another and share ideas.  Writing to the people in Ephesus, one of those  Roman Empire cities in what we know today as Turkey, Paul  had a vision of Christ pulling together all of creation, including the diverse gentile peoples  of Ephesus and beyond.  Beneath this dream is the idea that there is one creator of us all, who wants to restore positive relationship with all people and therefore the wholeness of creation itself. This is the dream, not that everyone become the same ( I,e, Jewish in Paul’s context) but that  each will have its place in the sacred circle of life through the heart of Christ.   The passage suggests some things needed to restore the sacred circle. 1. Grace- forgiveness and redemption This is the great gift that Paul believed made all the difference.  We can be restored to right relationship with God and with each other through the love and sacrifice of Christ Jesus .    Jesus makes us all children of God and gives us hope to stand before God blameless and whole.   Yet to find this redemption from sin, this freedom to live for God, we have to admit our need and turn to God in Christ Jesus.    When we think that we ourselves...

Read More
content top